Category Archives: Physical Therapy

School Therapy vs. Clinical Therapy: Is One Better?

School is often the first place that a deficit can be identified. A child struggles with a task and their teacher might suggest in-school therapy. Therapy offered through the school is typically performed by a therapist employed by the school or by a contracted therapist from an outside clinic. These sessions assist kids working on occupations that help complete school-related tasks. An occupational therapist might help a child with handwriting for example. Or, a speech therapist may assist a child in better communicating so that they can effectively participate in class. School therapy is vital to helping a child adjust in their learning environment, but it can be further enhanced by additional clinical therapy.

 

Clinical therapy refers to therapy outside of the school setting. Here, circumstances allow for longer sessions that can increase progress even more. Also, aside from additional time, therapists in a clinical setting are able to go beyond school-related tasks and work with the child on a more holistic range of occupations that help in all aspects of life, not just at school. In the clinic setting, foundational issues can be addressed that may be impacting a child’s participation or skills in both the school or community environments. The clinic setting, with its equipment and activities, helps with sensory processing by increasing attention span in the classroom. Kids can get the chance to work on core strength, to be able to sit upright in their chairs for longer periods of time. During clinic therapy, therapists are able to get to the root of the problem. In the school setting, a child can be provided with strategies that can help short term until increased skills are developed.

 

So, to answer our initial question, is one type of therapy better than the other? You might be surprised that the answer is “no”! Both types of therapy are crucial to your child’s success and offer their own unique benefits. Participating both school and clinical therapy maximizes treatment time for your child and allows time to work on increasing function at home and at school. Both are essential to most effectively achieving outcomes.

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What Is The Difference Between PT and OT?

Many parents ask us, “what is the difference between physical therapy and occupational therapy?” Some people think that pediatric physical therapy focuses on gross motor skills, while occupational therapy focuses on fine motor skills. This is not necessarily true. Although they are similar in many ways, pediatric physical therapy aims to treat the impairment or injury and help increase physical function. On the other hand, pediatric occupational therapy helps the child accomplish everyday tasks in light of their impairment. If we think about the word “occupational” or “occupation” we might think of a synonym, a job. Occupational therapy focuses on kids’ “jobs” or tasks like eating, bathing, dressing or grooming themselves. These jobs might be further complicated by a cognitive or developmental disability. Occupational therapy aims to help with navigating life despite these challenges.

 

The two can work in tandem as well. Pediatric physical therapy can help with muscle strength and flexibility that can greatly improve occupational capabilities. A child may be fitted with orthotics for toe walking (physical therapy) as a side effect of having cerebral palsy. Simultaneously, an occupational therapist could help the child complete daily tasks as a result of the limitation. Occupational therapy also includes treatment for sensory processing so that kids can complete daily activities. Helping kids that have aversions to certain foods, food textures, fabrics, types of clothing or sounds is part of occupational therapy.

 

If you are still not sure what type of therapy your child might need, please contact us to make an appointment for an initial evaluation at 704-799-6824. Pediatric Advanced Therapy is one of the premeir occupational and pediatric physical therapy facilities in the Charlotte area.

 

Pediatric Advanced Therapy

2520 Whitehall Park Drive Suite 350 Charlotte, NC 28273

134 Infield Court Mooresville, NC 28117

129 Woodson Street Salisbury, NC 28144

patkids.com

704-799-6824

 

Sources:

http://otaonline.stkate.edu/blog/occupational-therapy-vs-physical-therapy-whats-difference/

http://www.allalliedhealthschools.com/physical-therapy/occupational-therapist-vs-physical-therapist/

http://nspt4kids.com/therapy/what-is-the-difference-between-occupational-and-physical-therapy-for-children-north-shore-pediatric-therapy/

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What Should I Do If My Child Is Toe Walking?

Toe walking, like the name suggests, is the phenomenon of walking on the toes or balls of the feet. Toe walking is common in early walkers, and can sometimes last until your child is a toddler or older. Toe walking can be common in children with Cerebral Palsy or Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Along with these connections to neuromuscular or musculoskeletal conditions, toe walking may also be present in children with developmental disorders like Autism. However, being a toe walker does not always lead to another diagnosis. Regardless of the cause of toe walking, the issue can be helped with physical therapy.  

 

Other than noticing your child walking on their toes or the balls of their feet, toe walking my cause your child to frequently fall or stumble. They might also communicate having pain in their leg or foot. Results of toe walking can cause increased foot pain in adulthood, hip and knee issues and balance difficulties. Toe walking can be easily prevented or treated through physical therapy.

 

Your therapist may use techniques to stretch and strengthen the muscles including:

  1. Taping the area to guide correct positioning
  2. Orthotic intervention or shoe modifications
  3. Night splinting
  4. Manual manipulation and therapy

 

Early intervention using these techniques will help and will likely decrease the need for later invasive procedures or surgery.

 

To schedule an appointment to see if pediatric physical therapy could help your child, please call as at 704-799-6824.

 

Pediatric Advanced Therapy

2520 Whitehall Park Drive Suite 350 Charlotte, NC 28273

134 Infield Court Mooresville, NC 28117

129 Woodson Street Salisbury, NC 28144

patkids.com

704-799-6824

 

Sources:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/toe-walking/basics/definition/con-20034585

Idiopathic Toe Walking – Cincinnati Children’s Hospital

http://blog.dinopt.com/toe-walking/

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Consistency is Key in Pediatric Therapy

When your child is in need of occupational therapy, physical therapy, or speech therapy, therapists will spend time creating a plan specific to him/her. Therefore, it is essential for your child to attend each session to reap the maximum benefit. Consistency is key! Here are some tips to getting the most out of treatment for your child:

  • Don’t be late: Lateness cuts into treatment time. When you are running late, your child’s therapist is forced to cut out activities, making hard decisions on which treatment activities are more important. The catch is, they are all important activities!
  • Practice makes perfect: To learn a new skill or overcome a challenge, repetition is key. If you miss out on a session, your child gets less practice.
  • Take steps forward, not backward: Everyone gets sick sometimes! But, too many missed sessions can delay progress or even sabotage skills that have already been learned.
  • Consistency can mean quicker progress: Attending therapy sessions can mean extra time in the car or time away from home. Just remember that this time is worth it! The more you commit to your child’s care plan, the quicker they will see progress.  

If you would like to schedule a free 30-minute screening for a new patient or an appointment for an established patient, please call 704-799-6824.

Pediatric Advanced Therapy aims to provide the highest quality of care to all patients. In the interest of all of our patients, all cancellations require 24 hour notice to avoid a cancellation fee. In the event that the therapist needs to cancel, we will reschedule your child with another therapist for continuity of treatment.

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