Tag Archives: child development

What Is The Difference Between PT and OT?

Many parents ask us, “what is the difference between physical therapy and occupational therapy?” Some people think that pediatric physical therapy focuses on gross motor skills, while occupational therapy focuses on fine motor skills. This is not necessarily true. Although they are similar in many ways, pediatric physical therapy aims to treat the impairment or injury and help increase physical function. On the other hand, pediatric occupational therapy helps the child accomplish everyday tasks in light of their impairment. If we think about the word “occupational” or “occupation” we might think of a synonym, a job. Occupational therapy focuses on kids’ “jobs” or tasks like eating, bathing, dressing or grooming themselves. These jobs might be further complicated by a cognitive or developmental disability. Occupational therapy aims to help with navigating life despite these challenges.

 

The two can work in tandem as well. Pediatric physical therapy can help with muscle strength and flexibility that can greatly improve occupational capabilities. A child may be fitted with orthotics for toe walking (physical therapy) as a side effect of having cerebral palsy. Simultaneously, an occupational therapist could help the child complete daily tasks as a result of the limitation. Occupational therapy also includes treatment for sensory processing so that kids can complete daily activities. Helping kids that have aversions to certain foods, food textures, fabrics, types of clothing or sounds is part of occupational therapy.

 

If you are still not sure what type of therapy your child might need, please contact us to make an appointment for an initial evaluation at 704-799-6824. Pediatric Advanced Therapy is one of the premeir occupational and pediatric physical therapy facilities in the Charlotte area.

 

Pediatric Advanced Therapy

2520 Whitehall Park Drive Suite 350 Charlotte, NC 28273

134 Infield Court Mooresville, NC 28117

129 Woodson Street Salisbury, NC 28144

patkids.com

704-799-6824

 

Sources:

http://otaonline.stkate.edu/blog/occupational-therapy-vs-physical-therapy-whats-difference/

http://www.allalliedhealthschools.com/physical-therapy/occupational-therapist-vs-physical-therapist/

http://nspt4kids.com/therapy/what-is-the-difference-between-occupational-and-physical-therapy-for-children-north-shore-pediatric-therapy/

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Red Flags: Occupational Therapy Screening Tool for 4-Year-Olds

What are red flags? A red flag is characterized as marker of delayed development in a child. These can manifest in many different ways. While every child is unique in their development and timeline of growth, there are certain behaviors that are universally causes for concern. For 4-year-olds, be aware if your child:

  • Not enjoying new toys, appears stuck on familiar or desired toys
  • Limited interest in tools/activities such as hammering, using scissors and markers, sorting objects, etc.
  • Unable to use one toy/object to represent something else
  • No interest in peer play, unable to engage in cooperative play
  • *Now able to play with single object or play theme approximately 10 minutes, quiet play approximately 30 minutes

 

Pediatric Advanced Therapy provides physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy to the greater Charlotte area. We have two offices in Mooresville and Salisbury, with a Charlotte office opening in May 2017.

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Red Flags: Occupational Therapy Screening Tool for 2 to 3-Year-Olds

What are red flags? A red flag is characterized as marker of delayed development in a child. These can manifest in many different ways. While every child is unique in their development and timeline of growth, there are certain behaviors that are universally causes for concern. For 2 to 3-year-olds, be aware if your child:

  • No enjoyment of rough and tumble play
  • No interest or difficulty scribbling, completing 4-5 piece puzzles, building, etc.
  • Not able to engage in parallel play (beside a peer), snatching toys from others typical at this age
  • No observation of using toys as agents (doll feeding self, dump truck scooping sand)
  • Not asking who, what, where, why questions
  • Not able to locate parts of body (eyes, nose, etc.)
  • Should be able to engage in quiet play approximately 15 minutes

Pediatric Advanced Therapy provides physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy to the greater Charlotte area. We have two offices in Mooresville and Salisbury, with a Charlotte office opening in May 2017.

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Red Flags: Occupational Therapy Screening Tool for 1 to 2-Year-Olds

What are red flags? A red flag is characterized as marker of delayed development in a child. These can manifest in many different ways. While every child is unique in their development and timeline of growth, there are certain behaviors that are universally causes for concern. For 1 to 2-year-olds, be aware if your child:

  • No interest in engaging with moving toys (balls, cars/trucks, pull toys)
  • Not attempting to feed self with spoon
  • Does not use trial and error (example: attempts something once and gives up)
  • Does not appear to use gestures and words to communicate wants and needs (limited pointing, showing, offering)
  • Limited exploration of environment (not climbing on/off chairs, going up/down steps, etc.)
  • Refuses or unable to eat same meals as rest of family
  • Unable to use utensils/will only eat with hands
  • Unable to use straw cup or sippy cup
  • No pretend or cooperative play observed (examples-hide and seek, chasing, brushing dolls hair, etc)
  • By 2 years, should be able to engage in quiet play approximately 5-10 minutes

Pediatric Advanced Therapy provides physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy to the greater Charlotte area. We have two offices in Mooresville and Salisbury, with a Charlotte office opening in May 2017.

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